ME, MYSELF, AND SELF-PORTRAITURE

My name is Gilmar Smith, and I’m addicted to self-portraiture. Self-portraits have been around for a very long time. “Portrait of a Man in a Turban,” painted by Jan van Eyck in 1433, is claimed to be the first self-portrait ever made. The first photographic portrait ever taken was a self-portrait taken in 1839 by Robert Cornelius, who was a photography enthusiast and a chemist in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Artists such as Rembrandt, Michelangelo, Leonardo da Vinci, Francisco Goya, Monet, Parmigianino, Gustave Courbet, Vincent van Gogh, Pablo Picasso, Frida Kahlo, Andy Warhol, Vivian Maier, just to name a few, were also self-portrait artists. There has always been a misconception about selfportraits being linked to narcissism, but self-portraits are a way of expression, just like any other form of art. Selfies vs....
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LOUPEDECK

“Maximum Workflow” revolves around tools that help you get to your destination faster, which is the ultimate aim for most photographers who want to spend less time in front of the computer and more time behind the camera, with family, or whatever their top priority is. We’ve looked at plug-ins and modular hardware, but now we’re going to look at a dedicated tool for speeding up processing in Lightroom. That tool is the Loupedeck. Loupedeck began as project by photographer Mikko Kesti. With a team of former Nokia engineers, they created a prototype, and then pitched the product through Indiegogo. They hit 488% of their required funding, meaning the product was a runaway hit. Packaging and Design Now getting funding isn’t the same as being a success, but before I even plugged in the Loupedeck, I was impressed with the...
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KEEPING UP WITH LIGHTROOM’S EVOLUTION

Lightroom 1.0 released the same year as the first iPhone, and a lot has changed over these last 10 years regarding computer technology, mobile technology, and how we use these devices in our workflow. For most of this time, Lightroom existed in two nearly identical flavors: Windows and Mac. Desktop computers have waned in use over this period, as laptops became more powerful, but whether you used a desktop or a laptop (or both), you either ran Lightroom on Mac or on Windows. In 2014, because of the explosion in popularity of mobile devices (in the form of phones and tablets) and their increasing computing power, Adobe released a Lightroom Mobile app (along with a boatload of other Adobe apps) designed for the mobile platforms. Updates to the Lightroom Mobile app come at a frequent pace, and its feature set has begun to rival that of...
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LIGHTROOM MOBILE TRICKS THAT WILL CHANGE YOUR LIFE

The Lightroom Mobile app helps you shoot, retouch, and post photos—all on your phone, which is pretty amazing! So here are my top five tips to help you use the app to its full potential! Keep in mind that some of these tricks will only work if you’re a Creative Cloud member, which allows you access to some advanced features and the ability to sync collections from the Lightroom desktop to the Lightroom app on your mobile device. [For some essential concepts and techniques for Lightroom Mobile, check out page 62.—Ed] Tip #1: Shoot with Your Lightroom Camera Shooting with the Lightroom Camera is a great way to take your phone photography to the next level, and here’s why: You can select your ISO, shutter speed, exposure, and even capture your photo as a DNG (if you have iOS 10 and some android phones)! A RAW file means...
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SHIMMERING LIGHT EFFECT

A few years ago I was looking to create a cover image for a new book and came up with the idea of a model in semiprofile, surrounded by a cool shimmering light. This is a look I’d used on a number of PR beauty photo shoots that had proved popular with a lot of clients. Essentially, I wanted to apply a cool white balance to a studio portrait photo of a model and overlay the image with a rippled lighting effect. For the studio lighting setup, the main light came from a large softbox just above the camera. I also had a couple of lights to either side, bouncing off large white boards to provide the wraparound backlighting (these backlights were set one stop higher than the main front light). I captured the photographs in RAW mode, so it didn’t really matter how the capture white balance was set, as I was able to apply the desired...
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THE PRIME PORTRAIT: THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN F/2.8 AND F/1.4

My lens assortment has grown and evolved throughout my career. I started with all prime lenses, as they were optically superior during that time. But zoom quality improved, and I started using two main lenses: 24–70mm and 70–200mm, both f/2.8. Optically, they were sharp, and the convenience of zooming through the focal lengths was terrific. Every five years or so, a sharper, quicker auto-focus version would come out, and I’d be first in line to upgrade. With these two lenses, I was good to go. But reviewing images after assignments and travel workshops, I realized I was missing something. I longed for the silky, soft bokeh that only a fast prime could produce. Wouldn’t my f/2.8 zoom lenses produce about the same quality of bokeh as f/1.4? Would using a fast prime lens for my portrait create a better shot? Obviously, there...
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